SLK Design, is it right?

Topics: User Forum
May 16, 2007 at 9:30 PM
Here is what we have come up with:

Root site has a tree menu and a slk webpart that sees all resources.

Subsites
One for ever teacher that has that teachers document resources, and a slk web part that views all resources
One for every class section that has a slk web part that has access to only that classes resources.

Does this sound right to anyone else?
What type structure are other people using?
Are there any ideas as to how to make slk work in a 800+ class and 1600+ learner solution?
May 22, 2007 at 6:16 PM
Remy, your site structure sound good. Students would be able to see any assignments they have when they come into the root site. If they go to their class section they only see content for that class. Similarly for teachers, they would be able to see all the assignments they have assigned from the root or their teacher site.

Where is your content being stored?

Here is what we have done:
We are a corporate training group so our needs are a little different. Also, we are sharing a site collection with other businesses so the top-level doesn't contain any content, etc. It is just a landing page essentially.

So we have a sub-site underneath for our business and we store all of our content in one document library in this site. We then have subsites under this for each type of training we do. We send our students to these sites where they only see the training that is assigned to them. We have a My Transcript page also that views all resources as some students cross multiple sites.

Now the interesting part, we have 3000 learners and turnover happens very quick so instead of assigning content to each and every student we built our own custom .aspx page that uses the SLK API and basically mimics the "Assign this content to myself" functionality. Additionally, we show the content to the learners via a list view, not the ALWP, and when they click on the link it passes the content id to our custom aspx page and uses the SLK API to assign the content and push them to the lobby page.

The beauty of this approach is that students don't have to crawl through a document library to find content, use the E-Learning actions menu, pick assign content etc. They just go to their site and click a link and all this learning is available on-demand. It fits a training scenario very nicely.