Beta - Are you able to change the points available?

Topics: User Forum
Nov 10, 2006 at 12:41 PM
Are you able to change the points available in SCORM 2004 content (e.g. solitaire example)?

I noticed that even if i change the point available to lets say 50, after completion of the assignment i get a total of e.g. 83.3 (which obviously refers to 100 points available).

If this is the case why the points possible are conifigurable??

Thanks!
Nov 10, 2006 at 7:44 PM
This is a good question and a topic that we spent quite a bit of time trying to figure out the "right" way to deal with points for SCORM 2004.

SCORM 2004 primarily uses scaled score as its score within the content, which has a range of -1,1. The other content types (SCORM 1.2 and Class Server) use a direct raw points per interaction rather than scaled score rolled up throughout the content.

At the SLK assignment level we wanted to come up with a points scheme that would set points at a similar scale across all content types yet still be meaningful for any single piece of content. For SCORM 2004, we decided to use the scaled score of the primary objective of the root activity multiplied by 100 to give a percentage-like score/points value. Thus regardless of what you change points possible to, you will always see a graded score from -100 to 100.

We thought about forcing SCORM 2004 points possible to be 100 and not allowing instructors to change it, but thought that might be too restrictive in cases where the instructor may have additional points for the assignment that they will manually add/subtract when entering a final score.

We also thought of applying the SCORM score as a scaling factor to points possible so if you set points possible to 50 and got 0.8 scaled score you would get 40 points, but we worried that the concept wasn't consistent across content types and could be confusing. For example, you can change points possible in the SLK assignment for Class Server content, but the content will still autograde out of the original scores possible in the content.

So that is some of the thought process. This isn't to say that this is the end-all right way to treat scores and final points for SCORM 2004 and the other content types. There may be better ways that will surface and if so, maybe we will want to make changes in future versions.

-Mark