functionality questions

Topics: User Forum
Aug 2, 2006 at 10:05 AM
Hi everyone,

I have some questions/proposals for the future releases of slk:

The scenario: A student has to read all relevant material for a class (documents, presentations, livemeeting sessions) and then take the exam (self assignment) in order to pass or fail.

1. Is it possible that the exam/test only allows 1 attempt for each student?

2. Where are the results/score of the exam stored? (database?). Are the scores accessible for future analysis/statistics? In this case of self-assignment does the instructor have to do anything?(grade, review, etc).

3. Will there be any support for creating tests/quiz with randomly picked questions from a pool of questions?

4. Will there be support for tracking/tracing a student's progress within an assignement? for example: the completed percentage, the time spent on an assignment, etc. Will these data be stored in the database for analysis/statistics?

5. Is it possible to force the students take an exam at a specific time and for a specific duration? for example the exam would start at 13:00pm and will finish at 14:00pm. after that time the test will be collected for grading no matter if some students havent completed it.

Thank you & best regards,
Panagiotis Adamos
Aug 2, 2006 at 5:47 PM
(Due to the 2000 character limit of the posts, I'll split this up.)

Most of this can be achieved with SLK V1 and SCORM 2004 content, but a lot of the functionality is dependent on how the SCORM content is designed and implemented. Answers to your specific questions are below.

1. Is it possible that the exam/test only allows 1 attempt for each student?

Yes, you can use SCORM 2004 sequencing rules to limit the number of attempts at any level in the content. For example, imagine a table of contents with a single “cluster” and many individual question pages in that cluster. You can set the sequencing rules to limit the number of times the user can attempt the cluster. There are also many other rules you can apply to control the sequencing further depending on the design intent of the content. For example, you could only allow users to navigate one question at a time and only be able to navigate forward, so they can’t visit previously answered questions.
Aug 2, 2006 at 5:48 PM
2. Where are the results/score of the exam stored? (database?). Are the scores accessible for future analysis/statistics? In this case of self-assignment does the instructor have to do anything?(grade, review, etc).

For e-learning content (SCORM 1.2, SCORM 2004, and Class Server) the results and scores for each individual question can be stored in the SLK database. I say “can be” because in the case of SCORM, this depends on the content storing the appropriate data. All of this data stored by the content is available in the database for future analysis.

Self-assignments do not have an instructor associated with them and are autograded and returned to the learner upon submission as complete. If you want an instructor in the workflow loop, you would likely want to have the instructor assign the assignment to the learners. Self-assignments are truly self-assigned and they will not appear to instructors through the SLK UI, but the assignment data is all stored in the database for future analysis.

3. Will there be any support for creating tests/quiz with randomly picked questions from a pool of questions?

SCORM 2004 allows content creators to randomize a set of pages (think of one question per page). You can also select a number of pages from a pool. For example, you could have 15 questions put in random order and then select 10 from that pool of 15 to present to the learner.

4. Will there be support for tracking/tracing a student's progress within an assignement? for example: the completed percentage, the time spent on an assignment, etc. Will these data be stored in the database for analysis/statistics?

I think most of this is possible with SCORM 2004, but it again depends on how sophisticated the content is. Any data that is stored in the database by the content will be available for analysis. SLK does not separately monitor completion percentage or time spent on an assignment.
Aug 2, 2006 at 5:48 PM
5. Is it possible to force the students take an exam at a specific time and for a specific duration? for example the exam would start at 13:00pm and will finish at 14:00pm. after that time the test will be collected for grading no matter if some students havent completed it.

You can restrict when an exam can start by setting the start date and time for the assignment. Assignments are not visible or accessible to the learner prior to this start time. The due date and time is not a hard stop; however, an instructor will be able to collect an assignment through the grading page. For example, at 14:00pm an instructor can go to the grading page and select “collect all”. After an assignment is collected, learners are not able to continue with the assignment, even if they are in the middle of it in the frameset.
Aug 3, 2006 at 9:22 AM
Thanks for the replies,

I have another question about self-assignment that confuses me:

Scenario: The instructor assigns a test to a student. The student then self assigns the same test to himself ("unofficial")as many times as he wants, he sees the questions finds the answers and then go and take the test assigned to him by the instructor ("official")

how this can be prevented?

Thanks,
Panagiotis Adamos,
META, GR
Aug 3, 2006 at 4:23 PM
Students can only self-assign content when they have access to the document library containing that content. To prevent this scenario, you can restrict the permissions on the document library so only teachers have access to it.
Aug 3, 2006 at 4:27 PM
Yes, the way to prevent this is to restrict the learner's access to the document library or the individual item in the doclib.

In SLK you can only create assignments if you have access to the content in the doclib. This includes both instructors and self-assignment. However, learners can access content via their assignments in SLK, even if they do not have access to the original file in SharePoint.

So, in the example you described, you could give instructors the ability to read/write in the doclib, but learners have no access so they can only access the test via their assignment from the instructor.

-Mark